US President Donald Trump pullout 12,000 troops from Germany as last deal with Putin before 2020 US Election

US President Donald Trump pullout 12,000 troops from Germany as last deal with Putin before 2020 US Election

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US President Donald Trump pullout 12,000 troops from Germany as last deal with Putin before 2020 US Election

The United States of America President Donald Trump has pullout 12,000 troops from Germany as his  last deal with Russia President Vladimir Putin before 2020 US Election. Since he came to office, Trump has obsessively picked at the ties that bind America to its allies. This week in one apparently wanton yank, he ripped one of those cords by announcing a plan to withdraw nearly 12,000 troops from Germany. This thin green thread of forces, woven through Germany's historic towns, rolling fields and dense forests, has for three generations helped ensure peace in Europe, embodying an unbreakable commitment between the former foes. 

Bavaria's state governor Markus Soeder, whose region hosts several US bases, also criticized Trump: "Unfortunately this seriously damages German-American relations. A military benefit cannot be seen. It weakens NATO and the U.S.A. itself."

Little surprise, then, that the Kremlin is gleefully exploiting Europe's consternation, with spokesperson Dmitry Peskov telling CNN: "We never hid that [we think] the less American solders there are on the European continent the calmer it is in Europe." Trump is the gift that keeps on giving for the Kremlin: his unpredictability, while often a pain, for them is continual grist for their propaganda mill.

It has taken America's 45th president almost four self-serving and destructive years to reach this point, but in pulling the trigger on withdrawing troops from Germany, one-third of the total stationed in the country, he has signaled an end to what Franklin D. Roosevelt, America's 32nd president, conceived as a post-World War II order based on common interest and collective aspirations.

Roosevelt and other leaders of his generation witnessed the worst of times as the great powers collided, propelled by a few evil self-possessed men; assuming Trump is not completely ignorant, he has chosen to ignore this obvious fact.

The problem for NATO and America's other allies is that there seems little that can hold Trump back from his impulses. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper echoed the President's words saying, "Germany is the wealthiest country in Europe. Germany can and should pay more to its defense."

This argument will ring hollow in the cavernous halls at NATO HQ in Brussels leafy suburbs, where commitment to 2% GDP came long before Trump began his presidency, as will the claim by Gen. John Hyten, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who said the drawdown would "bolster" America's support of its allies because it would "better distribute forces across Europe and increase the use of rotational forces."

Esper talked about a "strategic laydown" as some troops may move to Poland and others could end up in the diminutive Baltic states. And Jens Stoltenberg, NATO's perennially optimistic secretary general, said "the US had consulted closely with all NATO allies ahead of today's announcement" even though German officials expressed surprise when they first heard about the possible drawdown a month ago.

Stoltenberg has fought a persistent rearguard action against Trump's impulses to cut loose from NATO since the US President took office in January 2017. As recently as NATO's last leaders' meeting in Luton, England, in December 2019 Stoltenberg let Trump blow his own trumpet by announcing increasing GDP defense spending commitments he'd squeezed from the alliance's members.He is still trying to save the day now, claiming rather hopefully that Trump's decision "underlines the continued commitment by the United States to NATO and to European security."

The problem for NATO and America's other allies is that there seems little that can hold Trump back from his impulses. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper echoed the President's words saying, "Germany is the wealthiest country in Europe. Germany can and should pay more to its defense."

This argument will ring hollow in the cavernous halls at NATO HQ in Brussels leafy suburbs, where commitment to 2% GDP came long before Trump began his presidency, as will the claim by Gen. John Hyten, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who said the drawdown would "bolster" America's support of its allies because it would "better distribute forces across Europe and increase the use of rotational forces."

Esper talked about a "strategic laydown" as some troops may move to Poland and others could end up in the diminutive Baltic states. And Jens Stoltenberg, NATO's perennially optimistic secretary general, said "the US had consulted closely with all NATO allies ahead of today's announcement" -- even though German officials expressed surprise when they first heard about the possible drawdown a month ago.

Stoltenberg has fought a persistent rearguard action against Trump's impulses to cut loose from NATO since the US President took office in January 2017. As recently as NATO's last leaders' meeting in Luton, England, in December 2019 Stoltenberg let Trump blow his own trumpet by announcing increasing GDP defense spending commitments he'd squeezed from the alliance's members.He is still trying to save the day now, claiming rather hopefully that Trump's decision "underlines the continued commitment by the United States to NATO and to European security."Trump names retired Army colonel and Fox News regular as nominee for US ambassador to Germany

                                                                
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