Football Association chairman Greg Clarke says it is hard to see fans returning to matches any time soon

Football Association chairman Greg Clarke says it is hard to see fans returning to matches any time soon

Greg Clarke the Football Association Chairman has said it is hard to see fans returning to matches "any time soon" and the Premier League is preparing for the possibility of playing next season without fans.

Greg Clarke the Football Association Chairman has said it is hard to see fans returning to matches "any time soon" and the Premier League is preparing for the possibility of playing next season without fans.

Increasingly lucrative broadcasting deals and commercial opportunities mean matchday income contributes a smaller proportion of total revenue to clubs in the modern era than before - but it can still have a significant impact. And it is the bigger teams who stand to lose more.

Football finance lecturer Kieran Maguire uses eight charts to show the potential financial impact of a 2020-21 season behind closed doors.

Who makes the most from matchdays? The 'Big Six' clubs in the Premier League (Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United and Tottenham) had a collective matchday income of £495m in 2018-19, which represented 73% of the total made in the Premier League.

Manchester United, whose Old Trafford stadium has the highest capacity and average attendance in the Premier League, generated over £4m per match in 2018-19.

There were eight teams in total making over £1m per home fixture during the season.


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