World Health Organization Praises Italy For Making Genuine Sacrifices With The Restrictions

World Health Organization Praises Italy For Making Genuine Sacrifices With The Restrictions

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The World Health Organization (WHO) chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus praised Italy for making "genuine sacrifices" with the restrictions.
 World Health Organization Praises Italy For Making Genuine Sacrifices With The Restrictions

Until now only about 50,000 people in northern Italy had been affected by quarantines. Last week the government announced the closure of all schools and universities across the country for 10 days.

Weddings and funerals have been suspended, as well as religious and cultural events. Cinemas, nightclubs, gyms, swimming pools, museums and ski resorts have been closed.

Restaurants and cafes in the quarantined zones can open between 06:00 and 18:00 but customers must sit at least 1m (3ft) apart. People have been told to stay at home as much as possible, and those who break the quarantine could face three months in jail.

However, transport in and out of the regions affected continues. Flights continued to arrive at Milan's Malpensa and Linate airports on Sunday, though some scheduled flights were cancelled.

Chris Wood, a 26-year-old from London said he and his girlfriend had cut their holiday in Italy short and were waiting for a flight home from Venice.

"The initial announcement that Venice was in lockdown was quite terrifying but everything at the airport is pretty calm," he said. "I was in a bit of a panic as I thought we were going to be stuck in Venice for a month."

Last week was critical to seeing if Italy's coronavirus response had managed to halt the spread. If the numbers had begun to tail off, it would have suggested the containment measures had worked. They haven't.

With cases still surging, the government has moved to the next stage - and it's a dramatic step up. It's not quite a complete lockdown - planes and trains are still running and access will be permitted for emergency or essential work reasons. But police will be able to stop people and ask why they're trying to enter or leave the areas covered.

The question is whether this is all too late. It's believed the virus was circulating in Italy for weeks before it was detected. And there have now been cases in all 22 regions of the country. The government is now taking the most extensive containment measures outside of China. But is this a case of trying to shut the stable door after the horse has bolted

                                     
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